Thursday, 18 July 2013

Fire chaplain job description

This post includes 3 parts: duties list, job qualification and job description writing tips for Fire chaplain in details. A complete job description concludes Fire chaplain key duties/responsibilities, Fire chaplain job qualifications (knowledge, education, skills, abilities, experience…KSA model) and other ones such as daily tasks, key activities, key/core competencies, job functions/purpose…

I. List of Fire chaplain duties:

  1. Conducts chaplaincy program activities
  2. Attends District functions and activities
  3. Station visitation to develop and maintain relationships with personnel
  4. Hospital and home visitation of sick or injured employees and members of their families
  5. Follow-up with those impacted by incidents—referring them to appropriate resources for care and assistance
  6. Provides an employee assistance program by referring employees to appropriate resources for assistance
  7. Organizes and serves on the Critical Incident Stress Debriefing Team
  8. Regular reports to the Fire Chief
  9. Follows District ordinances and policies, particularly involving privacy
  10. Follows applicable state and federal regulations and statutes, particularly involving
  11. privacy
  12. Proposes general procedures, standards, and goals for chaplaincy program activities
  13. Prepares annual budget requests to the Fire Chief for chaplaincy program activities
  14. Evaluates needs and makes recommendations for the purchase of chaplaincy program materials and equipment
  15. Attends meetings and activities involving similar chaplaincy programs
  16. Responds to incidents and operates within the National Incident Management System
  17. Continuously improves operations; streamline work processes; and work cooperatively and jointly to provide quality seamless customer service
  18. Attends conferences and seminars to keep abreast of developments in emergency services and chaplaincy programs

II. List of Fire chaplain qualifications

  1. Ministerial practices in a non-denominational setting
  2. Critical Incident Stress Debriefing practices
  3. Resources for assistance referrals
  4. District streets and locations and businesses
  5. National Incident Management System awareness and operational practices
  6. Basic fire hazards and fire prevention concepts
  7. Basic first responder emergency medical response concepts
  8. Basic principles, practices, methods, and equipment employed in modern emergency services operations
  9. Basic rules and regulations of the department, District ordinances and policies, and state statutes and regulations pertaining to emergency services and public administration
  10. Basic safety standards and precautions pertaining to the emergency services equipment, and fire suppression and first responder emergency medical services activities
  11. Emergency experience with familiarity of all phases of emergency services operations
  12. Ministerial ordination in a recognized religious or spiritual denomination
  13. Public relations or community relations experience
  14. A degree in psychology, divinity, sociology, social service, counseling, etc.
  15. Successful completion of courses in emergency services administration, Critical
  16. Incident Stress Debriefing, crisis/grief counseling, etc..
  17. Other combinations of experience and education that meet the minimum requirements may be substituted

III. Tips to write job description

1. Too-long job description:

Looking at a too-long job description can frighten the candidates off and drive the away. A job description, no matter how important the job is, should not be included in more than 3 pages. If one focuses on too many things at a time, he shall definitely lose focus on the main items and get overwhelmed by the remaining; So, keep it concisely.

2. Too-short job description:

While too-long can be a problem, too-short is more a problem. It will ruin the meaning of the job description. A too-short one means it lacks necessary details and therefore, the candidate will not be able to understand while reading it.

3. Listing unnecessary functions or job duties:

Just classifying these into the “others” category will save you a lot of effort and space. On the other hand, the job description will become more dilute and easy to be neglected.

4. Key functions

Not listing key functions as required for the job can be a fatal mistake to a job description.

5. Grammar and spelling

Poor grammar and having spelling errors can ruin the job description, too. Never think that as you are the employer, you may have the right to make grammar or spelling errors while requires other not to. A job description with such errors is easily to be mistaken as a fake or ghost ads; as a result, the candidate will turn away from it.

6. Not specific enough:

Be specific and concise; if you don’t address the specific, then what the job description is for. It is for the candidate to understand just exactly what he needs to do or needs to have. Lacking details can confuse the candidates very well.

7. Not having the job description reviewed by others:

This is also a common mistake. One may be subject to bias, but more than one, especially with the help of those external advisor, the job description can be more perfect.

8. Using buzzwords or abbreviations:

In fact, it is not necessary at all to use such in a job description.

9. Using slang or legal words:

Just use common wording to communicate with others and don’t do anything extraordinarily.

10. Not updating the job description:

The same job may require different duties and responsibilities in different times, so, you cannot use the same job description for 2 different times.


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